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    I just finished “Alone on the Shield” by Kirk Landers. It might have been mentioned here already, but worthy of an update if it has been mentioned. It’s a story of a college couple reuniting after 40 years deep in the Quetico wilderness.

    He’s another Vietnam veteran with an anger management problem (it never ends) and she’s a canoe outfitter on the opposite end of the spectrum of let’s say, oh, I don’t know, maybe Red Lake Outfitters? Good read about solo canoe tripping, and all sorts of life’s complexities....

    Dirt cheap used from Abe Books.

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      Thanks for the tip Robin. I have it on order with the Inter-Libary-Loan program at the at the Fairbanks North Star Borough. Even more cheap, my property taxes at work.
      "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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        I think tonight it will be time to pull The Plague by Albert Camus back off the shelf for another read. It's about a town in Algiers that is put into quarantine in the 1940's because of an outbreak of the bubonic plague. It's not high drama but rather a look at how different people and the town as a whole deal with the threat and isolation. Highly recommended (and not just because of what's currently going on).
        https://www.amazon.com/Plague-Albert...s=books&sr=1-1

        And on a more site related note I recently found the book Letters from the Barren Lands, which are letters James Critchell-Bullock wrote during the grueling period he spent with John Hornby over-wintering on the barrenlands in the mid-1920's and then fleeing down the Hanbury and Thelon rivers the following summer. For anyone who has read Unflinching, Snow Man, and The Legend of John Hornby this is a wonderful read. Simply amazing that these letters just popped up, seemingly out of the blue, nearly 100 years after they were written.
        https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/10...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

        Alan

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          I agree with Alan about "Letters from the Barren Lands". It's a fascinating read for anyone with an interest in the Hornby saga.

          The editor, Carsten Iwers, is a veteran Arctic paddler. His website, northof60.de, is well worth a visit for some exceptional photography.

          ???????wjmc

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            Not canoe related, but I'd put in a plug for Here, There and Everywhere by Geoff Emerick.

            Emerick was hired fresh out of high school by EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London. His first week on the job the Beatles came in to record their first album. Working under George Martin, Emerick quickly rose to become lead engineer on many of the Beatles' albums, including Revolver and Sgt. Pepper and developed many ground-breaking recording techniques. If you are a Beatles fan, this is a fascinating book that will explain how and why those familiar recordings ended up sounding the way they do. I like to read Emerick's description of a recording session and then play the song. You can absolutely hear many of the things Emerick describes -- not only sound textures and effects, but various edits and overdubs. Also a fascinating look at the Beatles as a group and individually. Who knew that George Harrison had so much trouble with so many of his guitar solos that they would literally have to slow down the tape of the backing tracks during overdubs so Harrison could keep up with the slower tempo! At other times, McCartney would have to play the guitar solos for Harrison because, even at half speed, Harrison simply wasn't up to the job!

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              I'm wondering if anyone has a copy of this https://www.amazon.ca/Country-So-Int.../dp/0773538852
              It lists a map i'm really interested in, but I want to know if it is in the book before I order it.

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                After re-watching the Robert Perkins You Tube Video that Jim Dodds posted some time back, I am re-reading INTO THE GREAT SOLITUDE by Robert Perkins about his trip down the Back River. I read it long ago, enjoyed it then. I found it yesterday the in back of some books on the top shelf of the book case.
                "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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                  The Phantom Rickshaw and Other Stories, Rudyard Kipling. My wife found this book which belonged to her Dad, signed by him and dated 1948. Seven short stories, the best of which is "The Man Who Would Be King".


                  It was made into a feature film long ago starring Sean Connery and Michael Caine, and was a HIGHLY entertaining film. It's one of my all time favorites movies, along with Dr. Zhivago, The Blue Max, and Shawshank Redemption. If you can find it somehow, it's a good one to watch while we have guilt-free time at home!
                  Last edited by Patrick Corry; 03-26-2020, 04:24 PM.

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                    How times have changed. I dropped off at my country mechanic yesterday morning bright and early just in time to see him opening up. I pulled straight in and together we pulled out the summers on their alloys so he could make the seasonal wheel change for me. We kept our respectable distance given these sad times, which was far from the norm of us usually sipping coffee and talking over what's new and what isn't. I told him I'd give him plenty of space for the hour and take myself for a walk. I'd only come back inside to pick up the vehicle and pay. No more lingering these days. No shared pointing and poking under the hood, no leaning on the work bench gossiping about the latest, and no handshakes upon departure. How times have changed.
                    I grew up in the area so I knew it well. In fact an old school I attended was just up the road, now the Senior's Activity Centre. I'd played ball here, climbed trees there, bicycled along this road and rambled across those fields and through these forests. But this was a new view to me now. Sloping along the road as an aging man trying to listen to the birdsong beyond the creaking of my knees. I heard heron, blackbird and robin...A kilometre down the country road I stood stock-still as a small herd of deer gingerly stepped across from one woodland to the next. The creek was in full flow cresting it's banks and rushing through the tall reeds and washing the feet of maple, ash, and willow. The sun had already risen to just above treetop level and so was spreading a golden light across all creation, myself included. I felt a little reborn standing there trying to remember this landscape of my youth. Had it ever been this beautiful? Where has all this roadside trash come from? Was there always a heron rookery over yonder? Had I really swum in that creek looking so deep? I zipped up my jacket and pulled down my tuque and ambled on thinking about the word Wild. http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...ind-wilderness
                    Last edited by Odyssey; 03-27-2020, 09:22 AM.

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                      I am consistently reading mostly nonfiction, just finish "as far as my feet will carry me", by Josef M.Bauer. am half way through "the First World War a complete history" by Martin Gilbert. There are several books that I keep rereading, "Above the Gravel Bar" by Dave Cook that covers the Native canoe routes in Maine. And Coldwells "Roadside Geology of Maine

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                        Continuing with the wild theme I was out in the garden last week raking up leaves and tidying up in preparation for planting when I noticed my bulbs. When I say "my" bulbs I really mean Mother Nature's. These vigorous green sprouts have been bursting forth every spring since we moved here a dozen years ago. I have no idea what they are besides persistent as they've never flowered. A rabbit or two (are there ever just two for very long?) always nibbles off the top two inches without fail every few days until the plants are spent for the season and they droop and whither back into dormancy for another year. Last week however I was pleasantly surprised to see them tall and slender and untouched. Wonderful! Maybe the bunny family have moved on? I'd all but forgotten about them until this past weekend when I was pushing pea seeds into freshly turned topsoil dreaming of bountiful harvests, turned and saw the rabbits had returned. Drat. I guess I'll have to wait another year for those flowers whatever they are.
                        Which all prompted me to pluck a book off the shelf I'd always held in reserve for the kids. Kids of all ages would like Watership Down by Richard Adams. A story about a rogue bunch of rabbits who decide to escape a dreary and doomed warren for a courageous cross-country journey across English downs seeking a brighter future. Kids stuff for sure, but an adult could easily read adult themes of politics and social injustice into the story. I chose not to. Just a lighthearted romp through the countryside against all odds with a melancholy ending. Just like my garden?

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                          Back to the adult world. Just put down a book I bought Miranda for Christmas The Strawberry Thief by Joanne Harris. I tried to purchase the first books of the series but couldn't find them in stores. I guess I'll be internet shopping for them now anyway. These stories follow a young French woman with powers to read people's character and needs, perhaps looking into their souls; she also taps into the supernatural powers of the Mayan wind God Huracan. She is a witch, and has inherited her powers. In The Strawberry Thief she discovers she has passed these on to her second daughter with startling results. There's also a murder mystery involving the local Catholic priest who's reading the last will and testament of an old man confessing to...and that's how I got wrapped up in a book I had no intention of finishing. Now I'll have to search for the first 3 books (including Chocolat).
                          With days spent keeping not so very busy close to home and evenings spent eyes deep in books I may yet exhaust the bookshelves.

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