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    I'm a voracious reader, and one who usually reads several (or many) books at the same time. Fortunately I'm also able to put one down for weeks and then pick it up and get back into it. So, currently the list includes: Hamilton- yeah, the one that inspired the Broadway play; Seward- biography of Abe Lincoln's Secretary of State, purchaser of Alaska from the Russkies (Sewards Folly); The Island at the Center of the World- the foundation and development of the Manhattan Island colony by the Dutch West Indies Company, a fascinating read; and Endurance- the story of Ernest Shackleton's expedition to Antartica, a tale of privation and human durability unmatched!

    Books I have finished recently which are appropriate to this forum? The Lonely Land, Sigurd Olsen & Freshwater Saga, Eric Morse. Both highly recommended but probably known to many of you.
    Last edited by Patrick Corry; 12-21-2019, 01:32 PM.

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      Freshwater Saga I haven't read yet, forgot to search for it in the library system, thanks... The Lonely Land was one of the best.

      Currently starting out on The Little Ice Age and Europe's Encounter with North America, A Cold Welcome, Sam White... a bit of a grind esp after the hooks that Radisson Bush Runner had but will endure. The NA explorations after 1492 till about 1620 were poorly documented and hampered by a cold period (the little Ice Age) it seems. Lots of hardship and misfortune in these first forays, from the first few pages it seems the Florida natives were not all that receptive to the Spanish, plenty of slaughter and destruction.

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        I'm reading CANADIAN SPRING by Florance Page Jaques, she is the author of CANOE COUNTRY and SNOWSHOE COUNTRY all illustrated by her husband Francis Lee Jaques who also illustrated Sigurd F. Olson's early books.
        "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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          Beyond the Trees by Adam Shoalts. I read his earlier book, Alone Against the North and enjoyed it. I am a few chapters in and liking this one too.

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            Originally posted by Boreal Birch View Post
            I'm reading CANADIAN SPRING by Florance Page Jaques, she is the author of CANOE COUNTRY and SNOWSHOE COUNTRY all illustrated by her husband Francis Lee Jaques who also illustrated Sigurd F. Olson's early books.
            Thanks, I ordered Canadian Spring and Canoe Country from Abe Books, $12.65 includes shipping for the two used books.

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              Just finished rereading Wait Till Next Year/Doris Kearns Goodwin. As much about growing up in the 50's as it is about being a Brooklyn Dodgers fan in the 50s, which I can testify was hard work!

              Currently:

              Company of Adventurers/Peter C. Newman. A history of the Hudson's Bay Company and how it helped shaped the development and character of Canada.

              White Doves at Morning/James Lee Burke. I really like Burke's Dave Robicheaux mysteries. But this is my first first non-Robicheaux novel, taking place during the Civil War. It's okay, but I'll be going right back to Robicheaux (rereading The Tin Roof Blowdown)when I'm done. Also, for me listening to Will Patton narrating Robicheaux books is something special.

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                One day last week I stood in the book aisle of my local thrift store perusing the soft cover spines searching for that all elusive title that reaches out and grabs you. What grabbed me was Death Of A Policeman by M.C.Beaton. I taxed my memory trying to recall this title amongst the small pile of Hamish MacBeth mysteries written by this author sitting on our shelves. But no luck. I know we have several Death Of A ...books but I wasn't sure about the unfortunate policeman so I left the store empty handed. Coincidentally I see this week that the author has passed away.
                https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...hamish-macbeth
                It occurs to me I may not have that particular title, and I certainly would love a few more books about my favourite Highland cop. They're easy reading with whodunnit mystery and humour. I loved the subsequent TV series. The main character is a tall lanky layabout with plenty of charm but little motivation, who fills in time between solving murders with poaching salmon and going for long hikes amongst the lochs and Munros.
                https://www.mcbeaton.com/us/books/ha...eth_mysteries/
                Last edited by Odyssey; 01-04-2020, 01:05 AM.

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                  I've collected a few books by Pierre Berton and am currently plowing through The Arctic Grail, The Quest For The North West Passage And The North Pole 1818-1909. (McClelland & Stewart 1988) At over 600 pages it's no small read but it is unputdownable. Berton does well to describe the full spectrum of human character and lack of it shown by the major players in the push for the pole and the passage. I'm only a third into the book, so I still have many pages of (mis)adventures to go but my greatest admiration so far goes to Lady Jane Franklin, an intrepid scholarly adventurer in her own right, and with a social conscience her peers of that age seemed to have lacked. Others of note are Wm Scoresby, George Back, John Rae, Leopold McClintock...
                  Last edited by Odyssey; 01-13-2020, 09:08 PM.

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                    Just picked up this 1910 hunting book by Teddy Roosevelt, so far seems like a good read.
                    Not all who are lost wish to be found..............

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                      Originally posted by Robin View Post
                      Chapter XVI-Things to Avoid-Winter: Never leave your ax outside all night. Intense cold makes it exceedingly brittle.....
                      I broke a hatchet I owned for 50 years once quartering an elk on a cold morning. I was heartbroken. I had saved trading stamps as a kid to get that hatchet. Adding that book to my reading list.

                      I'm currently reading The Naturalist, Darrin Lunde - a bio about Ted Roosevelt.

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                        The Indian Canoe, by Russell D. Smith. Copyright 1925, and smells like it's been around mold and mildew for the entire 95 years. Just starting it but seems like a nice "Boys Life" type adventure about two friends, their Indian guide and a big old canoe in the Maine wilderness and the Moluncus River.

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                          Originally posted by Odyssey View Post
                          I've collected a few books by Pierre Berton and am currently plowing through The Arctic Grail, The Quest For The North West Passage And The North Pole 1818-1909. (McClelland & Stewart 1988) At over 600 pages it's no small read but it is unputdownable. Berton does well to describe the full spectrum of human character and lack of it shown by the major players in the push for the pole and the passage.
                          Brad, that is my all-time favorite compendium of Arctic exploration. It is one of my “travelling” books; it goes in the truck on long trips (and shows it). If I run low on reading material I can pick up that dog-eared copy of Arctic Grail and happily re-read favorite chapters for the 10th time.

                          Without any inter-library loans ready for pick up I came up empty on a visit to the local library yesterday.

                          Looking back over the last couple months on this most-favorite of threads I have book titles to plug into the library loan catalog, including (for my own cut and paste catalog convenience):

                          A Natural History of the Hedgerow


                          A Woman of No Importance

                          (Cool beans Dan, I just returned A Guest of the Reich. Gertrude Legendre was a socialite heiress OSS spy captured by the Nazis.)

                          Seward, and The Island at the Center of the World. I am a fan of anything Alaska history. And of Manhattan history; although an offer of free beer, weed and Happy Endings wouldn’t be enough to get me back to Manhattan. Thanks Patrick.

                          The Little Ice Age and Europe's Encounter with North America, A Cold Welcome. I picking and choosing here. Sometimes I need a book that takes some effort. Worth a shot.

                          Company of Adventurers. Dave, I second that recommendation. It must have been recommended on this thread or I’d not have found it.

                          That’s six titles to plug into the loan catalog. Bless y’all, and bless this thread.

                          Many of the recent bedside reads have been. . . .political. And across the spectrum/divide. And Not Safe for Paddling Board discussion.

                          Whispering – American Carnage

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                            The title cut-and-paste from this thread is always worth the effort. Three of those titles are now headed my way via inter- library loan. Although I am # 22 on the current wait list for one library copy.

                            A couple others were not in the library system, but were available as inexpensive copies from used book sellers on Amazon, to be delivered the first week(s) of February. I will sleep well knowing various books are headed my way over the next couple weeks.

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                              Originally posted by Boreal Birch View Post
                              I'm reading CANADIAN SPRING by Florance Page Jaques, she is the author of CANOE COUNTRY and SNOWSHOE COUNTRY all illustrated by her husband Francis Lee Jaques who also illustrated Sigurd F. Olson's early books.
                              I am reading “Canoe Country” per Birchy’s heads up, old school border country story of a 3 week husband and wife canoe trip. She’s a wonderful writer and the art work by Francis Lee Jacques is great imo, plus it was dirt cheap from Abe Books.

                              I also just received “Me and You and the Red Canoe” by Jean E. Pendziwol (she lives in Thunder Bay, Ontario) with art work by Phil. From a quick glance, it looks to be a nice little poetry book about a parent/child canoe trip.
                              I will save it for my first grandfather/grandchild trip and have the child read to me.
                              Another Abe book good deal.

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                                Just finished this Book. A good read, very descriptive. In a part of route they paddled I felt Like I was back there on 30 mile lake. 29th Day Surviving a Grizzly bear attack

                                https://www.amazon.com/Twenty-ninth-...aXESOIufAJC2Rg

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