Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Faraday cage for shuttle car smart keys

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by Odyssey View Post
    Car keys kept in zippered pockets are pretty secure.
    But a lot of them are not truly waterproof! (don't ask how I found out)
    I carry a spare in my day-bag double bagged in those little jewelry baggies

    Comment


      #17
      Maybe you could get a separate smart key that activates/deactivates a smart battery in your smart key. That way you could deactivate your smart key with a push of a button when you park your vehicle. You could carry the smart key for your smart key in an Altoids tin for extra security.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by gumpus View Post
        Maybe you could get a separate smart key that activates/deactivates a smart battery in your smart key. That way you could deactivate your smart key with a push of a button when you park your vehicle. You could carry the smart key for your smart key in an Altoids tin for extra security.
        According to the MBWorld thread I linked above, some MB smart keys but not others can be turned off with a double push of one of the buttons, which would be a great convenience. That linked thread also has some additional videos and diagrams of how thieves steal smart key cars.

        According to Wikipedia, MB introduced the smart key in 1998 under the name "keyless go", but now at least all the following car brands offer them under various names:
        • Acura: Keyless Access System
        • Audi: Advanced Key
        • Aston Martin: Keyless Entry and Push Button Start
        • BMW: Comfort Access or Display Key
        • Bugatti: Keyless Entry Remote
        • Cadillac: Adaptive Remote Start & Keyless Access
        • FIAT-Chrysler: Keyless Enter-N-Go
        • Ford: Intelligent Access with push-button start
        • General Motors: Passive Entry Passive Start (PEPS)
        • Honda: Smart Entry System
        • Hyundai: Proximity Key and smart entry key
        • Infiniti: Infiniti Intelligent Key with Push-button Ignition
        • Isuzu: Genius Entry
        • Jaguar Cars: Smart Key System
        • Kia Motors: Smart Key System
        • Lexus: Smart Access System
        • Lincoln: Intelligent Access System
        • Mazda: Advanced Keyless Entry & Start System
        • Mercedes-Benz: Keyless Go integrated into SmartKeys
        • Mini: Comfort Access
        • Mitsubishi Motors: FAST Key System
        • Nissan: Nissan Intelligent Key
        • Porsche: Porsche Entry & Drive System
        • Proton: Passive Keyless Entry
        • Renault: Hands Free Keycard
        • Riverside Manufacturing LLC: Intelli-Fob
        • SsangYong Motor: Smart Key System
        • Subaru: Keyless Smart Entry With Push-Button Start
        • Suzuki: SmartPass Keyless entry & starting system
        • Tesla: Model S Key
        • Toyota: Smart Key System
        • Volkswagen: Keyless Entry & Keyless Start or KESSY
        • Volvo: Personal Car Communicator "PCC" and Keyless Drive or Keyless Drive
        • Mahindra & Mahindra: Smart Key Module

        Again, for shuttling paddlers with smart key vehicles, I'm suggesting three solutions:

        1. Take the entire smart key in the boat with you in a completely waterproof bag or box. You won't have to worry about electronic theft once you paddle a few hundred yards away from the vehicle and the EM connection signal between key and car is completely dissipated.

        2. Keep the the smart key with the mechanical key insert removed hidden in the vehicle inside a Faraday cage, so you can lock the doors when you leave the vehicle at the put-in and so thieves can't detect the EM signal from the key while you are away. In the boat with you, take only the mechanical key insert, which won't have to be waterproofed. You can use the mechanical key to open the doors when you return from the trip, and then you can start the car by removing the smart key from the Faraday cage.

        3. Do both 1 and 2, so you have two key solutions available should you lose one key on the trip.


        Comment


          #19
          It's possible I am dense but what if you have to mail a key to the shuttle driver so he can over the course of your trip move the car from the beginning to the end?
          I am thinking of the Allagash of course. How do you deal with that.

          So far I think I will keep my aging truck with a dumb key.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by yellowcanoe View Post
            It's possible I am dense but what if you have to mail a key to the shuttle driver so he can over the course of your trip move the car from the beginning to the end?
            I am thinking of the Allagash of course. How do you deal with that.

            So far I think I will keep my aging truck with a dumb key.
            Yes, keep your dumb key truck. But to answer the question, I see two possibilities:

            1. You should have two smart keys for all these cars. I'd mail the shuttle driver one key, keep the other in the boat with me waterproofed, and then drive to the shuttler pick up the first key from him at the end of the trip.

            2. If for some reason you only have one smart key, you'd have to mail it to the shuttle driver and then pick it up from him at the end of the trip without the ability to drive to him. He'd have to come meet you with the one and only key, unless you have him hide the one key near the car.

            Comment


              #21
              OMG Glenn this is so complicated. Its been a decade since I went truck shopping.. Number 1 seems to be the only option that makes sense when shuttles can take a full day round trip as on the Upper Missouri or Allagash.

              It is nice that there are Otter Boxes for keys and hearing aids ( another gidget that hates moisture)

              Comment


                #22
                Maybe a simple solution would be to drive a vehicle with manual transmission. It seems like no one drives them anymore (other than my family) so the odds of a thief stealing your car/van/truck, even if left unlocked, is pretty remote.

                That's all for now. Take care and until next time....be well.

                snapper

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by snapper View Post
                  Maybe a simple solution would be to drive a vehicle with manual transmission.
                  snapper
                  Unfortunately that isn't even an option with most vehicles (and even many trucks) nowadays.

                  But thankfully I don't drive anything remotely new and both my car and truck are manual. I like to think of it as theft deterrent as well.

                  Alan

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Never have luck with Valet parking with our car. The hospital where I had hip replacement had valet parking. It was required and free. They had to find the old guy that could drive standard and it took some time.

                    However our grandkids do know how to drive standard. Ice up is starting and the loop the loop donuts on the lake could be possible in early Jan

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X