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    #16
    I use aluminum angle stock as fire irons. They seem plenty strong enough unless you trip with a 15 gal stock pot. I store them in a cordura sleeve.

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      #17
      I seldom cook on fire ...when I do its pretty simple. Usually on a stick or a spit, or in foil pouches.

      On any well used site around here you can usually find a fridge or oven grate laying about that everyone uses.

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        #18
        I should specify that we always cook on fire and almost all the time in a fire box. Just more efficient, less wood, fire is right under what you are cooking even in hight wind, leave no trace, and up here we are allowed to use them even during fire bans!
        Down side is they are a bit heavy, I would love to have one the same size as mine and same model but in Ti... It would be probably 30 percent lighter!!

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          #19
          Canotrouge how thick do you think the metal would need to be if the firebox was made out of Ti?
          Jim

          on topic I’ve got some tent stakes like the fire irons so I might try them for the next pot of tea.
          Last edited by Boatman53; 12-16-2019, 09:36 AM.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Boatman53 View Post
            Canotrouge how thick do you think the metal would need to be if the firebox was made out of Ti?
            Jim

            on topic I’ve got some tent stakes like the fire irons so I might try them for the next pot of tea.
            I have no Idea, I have a four dog ti wood stove that is 15 percent larger than my old Knico stove and is 30 percent lighter.... But I don't know what thickness Ti it is made out of!

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              #21
              If I've got the extra room on a simple trip, I like what I've grown up calling "fire pipes". Buy one 3/4"x 8' conduit and one 1/2" x 8' conduit. Saw into 2' lengths. Pinch about 1.5" of one end of each in a vise, leaving the other end alone. To assemble, put all the 1/2" pieces into the 3/4" ones. You now have a set for you and one for a friend. The cool thing about the round pipe is that that flattened part will be able to turn to fit whatever uneven surface you stick under it. If you end up using galvanized pipe, you need to burn that off first, but most folks know about that and how to do it. And if not, there's been plenty of discussion elsewhere.
              Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you. John Muir

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                #22
                A couple of 24” titanium fire irons take up little space and weigh around 8 oz. (0.5” OD, ~0.4” ID, Grade Whatever)

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                  #23
                  for cooking on ground fires i have back pack able ss and titanium grates, a small titanium firebox and recently been using these ss grates with folding legs, super simple and pack easily, esp canoe or truck camping. They come in 3 sizes, I have the middle one. Works really well, been leaving the other stuff at home lately.


                  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MHV5V9B...v_ov_lig_dp_it
                  .
                  Last edited by deerfly; 01-02-2020, 10:47 PM. Reason: forgot to add link

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                    #24
                    Like Robin I sometimes use rocks to support my pots/pans but more often I just use pieces of wood. It adds an extra layer of drama and excitement to cooking over a fire.

                    Alan

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                      #25
                      Alan, I like your style!

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Seeker View Post
                        If I've got the extra room on a simple trip, I like what I've grown up calling "fire pipes". Buy one 3/4"x 8' conduit and one 1/2" x 8' conduit. Saw into 2' lengths. Pinch about 1.5" of one end of each in a vise, leaving the other end alone. To assemble, put all the 1/2" pieces into the 3/4" ones. You now have a set for you and one for a friend. The cool thing about the round pipe is that that flattened part will be able to turn to fit whatever uneven surface you stick under it. If you end up using galvanized pipe, you need to burn that off first, but most folks know about that and how to do it. And if not, there's been plenty of discussion elsewhere.
                        I never bring anything and cook on rocks or logs (or a whitegas stove), but your telescoping pinched tube fire pipes sound intriguingly like a footbrace. It would be way cool to have a footbrace you could pull out for fire irons if need be. I guess it would have to be titanium, aluminum would be too soft and steel to heavy/rusty.

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                          #27
                          Large heavy irons, as was tradition, won't work well for me, but I do appreciate their history. I wish we'd tripped this way with the kids when they were young trippers. Spacious cooking on large fires would've been most welcome and friendly. Now I prefer smaller fires with just me or the two of us. I have a variety of choices from white gas, propane, alcohol and wood burners. I'm usually choosy about the condition of the campsite. I believe "less is more" in campsite living. No bric a brac frick a frack homemade furniture cluttering up the site, no bonfire clusterfeck rock piles mounded in the middle. I really only need 3 rocks, preferably smooth and angular. One for each side and one larger for the back, hopefully facing the onshore breezes at dawn and dusk. That's all. I often build my own always on a bare piece of granite shield, sometimes down by the water. My twig stove works well this way but I also have a small bakers cooling rack that serves as a lightweight grill spanning the rocks. I scorch the pots straight on burning logs without shame just as well. Whichever I'm in the mood for. But as I say I'm pondering taking up a bit of tradition by including a pair of smaller lighter irons in my kitchen fire kit. The propane stove has been retired for years, as has been the white gas stove. The tiny alcohol stove is mostly for emergencies (it boils water in under 5 minutes). I pretty much cook on fire these days. Where we go I'm never short of tinder, branch and bark. And I love small simple fires, enjoying more with less.
                          Last edited by Odyssey; 01-04-2020, 01:07 AM.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Odyssey View Post
                            I'm pondering taking up a bit of tradition by including a pair of smaller lighter irons in my kitchen fire kit.
                            Your lightest, but not cheapest option, would probably be to get a couple of 24” sections of titanium tubing and cut a half round on each end to make your own. Titanium Joe’s has some in stock for what passes as a discount, and they do ship in Canada.
                            https://www.titaniumjoe.com/index.cf...0.400:0.050:SA

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                              #29
                              Thanks Carp. Good link. I will save that.
                              What started this whole thought thread of mine, and a whole bunch others, was reading about some traditional methods and gear. Seeing the Temagami fire rings etc caused me to tuck this idea in the back of my mind for later ruminating. It's getting crowded back there, and likely the fire iron idea might've stayed nothing more than a forgotten plan, but for my wife. I thought out loud one day about sourcing some stainless and she said "I'm sure where I work there's some stock down in the industrial shop . Betcha one of the guys would cut you some."
                              I replied "Oh, well. Um, ahh, that would be too much to ask. I wonder if they've got some titanium kicking around?"
                              We will see how this goes.
                              I am liking the idea of tripping with a small grate and 2 irons. No more stoves. I'm letting my mind wander some more.

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                                #30

                                I have to admit I got frustrated internet searching for fire irons. It seems they're not a common thing, especially the 2 bar setup I was trying to investigate. But I did come across a fire iron arrangement I'd never heard of before. Likely some of you use this yourselves on trips. Apparently some people drive iron stakes in the ground which support (swinging?) pot supports. Interesting. Do any of you camp with this type of setup? What other types are there?

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                                Last edited by Odyssey; 01-05-2020, 01:32 PM.

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