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    Fire Irons

    I've recently decided to add to my gear and try a traditional method of cooking over fire. It seems the ultimate in simplicity, involving only 2 iron bars laid across rocks over embers to provide pot support. No grill. No stove. No fuss. No bother. Going even simpler often I'll just place my scorched pots directly on logs to save time and prep. Let the low flames lick the pots while I get on with other chores. But I'm adding to my kit and "cuisinal repertoire", exploring alternative ways to canoe, camp and cook.
    A pair of irons may become part of a more traditional collection I'm assembling for some simpler travels.
    Here is a photo from a Tim Gent blog. http://www.timgentoutdoors.com/
    Click image for larger version  Name:	tim gent fire irons.jpg Views:	0 Size:	306.0 KB ID:	102076

    Does anyone else use fire irons?
    Last edited by Odyssey; 12-13-2019, 11:46 AM.

    #2
    Take a trip to the nearest dump site, looking for a old bed frame. A few minutes with a hack saw should be all you need to make fire irons of various lengths.
    I have never used fire irons, always just used grills balanced on rocks or logs.
    "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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      #3
      A fiend black smith made me what I call fire spikes... it is 3 piece of round steel rods that have an eye at one end and when place together form a triangle that you place on three rocks and you set your pot on that triangle, the triangle is ajustable w/o moving the rocks so you can use different size pots...

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        #4

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          #5
          fire spikes
          Wow, I like that and REALLY easy to make! Next time I light the forge, I'll have to get me some. Is one shorter than the others or are the rings just large enough to allow them to disengage for transport?

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            #6
            Oh... to answer Odyssey's question: I've generally used firewood for pot support but the irons (or spikes) would allow for smaller fires and less time spent soaking logs before departure from the site. As long as they weren't excessively bulky, they're a great idea.

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              #7
              I salvaged some 1" copper pipe, cut into 2 - 18" lengths. I'll see how these do. They're very light and strong enough. The fire will never get hot enough to cause any problems and I won't be placing food directly on them. That iron triangle is clever.

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                #8
                I use a simple "trivet" made out of 3/16" X1 1/4" flat steel stock. One piece is bent at each end at 90 deg to form legs, and the other which is 1/2 the length and has the 3rd leg bent on it's end is riveted to the center of long piece so it can fold for transport or swing out to put a pot on. Sorry--no picture.

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                  #9
                  I just use rocks to balance my frying pan on, but those irons look nice. HOOP did a video (https://youtu.be/_1bJebnATbk) on Purcelle Trench Grills http://www.purcelltrench.com/grills.htm

                  I would try that Travelers Grill @ $49.00 US when I cruise about in my square stern canoe with the G'Kids.

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                    #10
                    +1 on the Purcell, but those 3 irons are a nice touch also but I don't want to carry them too far.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Gamma1214 View Post

                      Wow, I like that and REALLY easy to make! Next time I light the forge, I'll have to get me some. Is one shorter than the others or are the rings just large enough to allow them to disengage for transport?
                      There is a ring only at one end.. I’ll take more pictures today!

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                        #12
                        My father used two pieces of wall mount for shelving. These "U" shaped bars worked well. I just use firewood, or lash a tripod.
                        "There's a whisper on the night-wind, there's a star agleam to guide us, And the Wild is calling, calling . . . let us go." -from "The Call of the Wild" by Robert Service My trail journal: DuctTape's Journal

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                          #13
                          Some good reading that got me started on this in the first place. Next comes the RO I guess.
                          http://ottertooth.com/Temagami/Traditions/fireplace.htm

                          http://ottertooth.com/Temagami/Tradi...place-diag.htm
                          Last edited by Odyssey; 12-14-2019, 05:28 PM.

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                            #14
                            This is the ajustable fire triangle better photos!! Made out of 5/16” round stock...
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Canotrouge; 12-15-2019, 12:00 AM.

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                              #15
                              for decades my fire irons have been nothing more than a couple of pieces of rebar about 2' long, they'll easily support a couple of 3gal stock pots for large groups, fit well on all but the largest pits, and can hold up the ugliest, most twisted grills nicely. they've also doubled as stakes for a large fly in heavy wind, and live in a bag made from the leg of an old pair of jeans.

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